Saturday, January 22, 2011

Blue Phalaenopsis Orchid

Longwood Gardens's Orchid Extravaganza opened today.  I'll post a longer blog about the display in a few days, but I wanted to highlight one amazing orchid, the Blue Phalaenopsis.  Yes, you read that correctly, blue!  As any orchid lover knows, this just doesn't exist.  Longwood is highlighting a new technique of injecting dye into the roots of an orchid while the flower buds are forming.  When they bloom, they show an electric blue color.  I can't say that I particularly liked it, but I certainly was blown away by it!



10 comments:

  1. Hello there! Those blue Phalls look great, even they are colored. I am engaged in creating floral decorations, so I would like to ask if I may use your photos. Of cource, I will add your name or this link as a source. Check out my web site: www.hoya.sk

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  2. Thanks for the info! I saw these in a midwest retail store and thought that they were dyed. Now we know for sure!

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  3. How can companies charge so much for a blue orchid when it is just a shot of die? Do we have to disgrace Mother Nature in this way to make a buck?

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  4. Anything to make a buck, why not just spray paint them with colored floral spray any color you want, it works better. A friend of mine did just that for an orchid show back in the 1960's. He used cymbidiums. Green flowers, red lip, blue flowers yellow lip. They almost thru him out of the show and made him promise not to do it again or he could not come back. So this is not new, color orchids or flowers. I think you hit it when you didn't like the color. They are doing anything nowdays with imported phals to make a buck because there are so many being sent to the market. Sell it for $15 like the rest of the phals sent growing in that ball of moss they will surely die in. The importers love it when people try to grow in that moss, it's a definite "dead" in about a year. These will be blue for a lot less time, too bad people will be duped into buying this color enhanced plant thinking it's something it isn't !!

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  5. I saw one of these at Home Depot and was instantly ammazed by it since I had never seen a blue phal before. I looked closely at it and noticed the blue color in the root, so I suspected it was dyed. I'm glad I didn't spend $40 on it since it will never bloom blue again. Kind of a waste of money in my opinion.

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  6. Hideous. The bloom color fades almost immediately, and buds that have not opened will open white. This is a marketing gimmick, no different from dyeing white carnations green for St. Patrick's Day. The "patented method" of injecting blue dye into the plants' vascular system is no technological advancement, just an artifice of commerce.

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  7. You can use blue ink also or any other color ink not only to orchids but to any cut flowers. Mix ink with water and keep feeding them and for cut flowers mix some ink in water and let the flower suck this water.

    Personally i dont like doing this as they look fake.

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  8. My husband brought me some of these for Valentine's Day last night (late gift). I was so angry. They were so fake looking and so pathetic (drooping) and reminded me of something that should be in front of a velvet painting. Not to mention all the work I had done to decorate the table in reds and pinks and whites with antique silver. He comes in with a big blue plastic vase and these fake looking bright blue plastic-looking things. It was all they had left at 8 pm at the grocery store. That should be an indication right there. Thanks for letting me see your posts and letting me vent. I am a traditionalist at heart. Why dye a flower unless it's for St. Patrick's Day or some prom event or homecoming for kids. I have seen some bridal websites where the ladies loved them, but not for me thank you.

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  9. I am a professional floral designer and manager. I have had all of the natural colors of phals in my store; they sell pretty well. I just got in 10 of these blue ones and 10 deep purple dyed phals, as well. When customers ask me how it's done, I tell them the truth - that the plants are dyed. When customers ask me what I think, I tell them the truth still - that the color is brilliant and good for a "wow-factor." I tell them how their orchids will not bloom blue or purple again, but will bloom a beautiful, elegant white. I explain that they are getting, in essence, two different colors of orchids in one plant. After this explanation and professional opinion, my customers have been buying them. Once the facts are explained, customers can make an informed decision. If they feel like they are being tricked, they are less likely to buy.

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  10. I bought a blue one in November of 2012, which started me into buying 39 more orchids of different genesis because I fell in love with orchids.
    The strange thing about it is the spike itself as well as the leaves had a blue tint in them (the older leaves still do). Now it grew many new leaves and the original spike died back completely but it has grown a new spike and has buds forming. Blue or White, I'll love it just the same, orchids are beautiful AND fun to grow! The Cattleyas with (some, not all) of their wonderful fragrance is fantastic!

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